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Screenwriting & Filmmaking Links 7
Dec 6th, 2015 by paul peditto

linksAt the risk of stealing Carl Sagan’s most famous riff,  I have combed the “BILLIONS AND BILLIONS” of Internet cosmococcic screenwriting sites for another batch of Screenwriting and Filmmaking resources. More will follow, but these are pretty good. I hope they help you, Good Reader. There’s a ton of great, free stuff out there, if you have the patience to make your way through the Wild Wild West of BS screenwriting crapola.

Let’s take a look…

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  • REDDIT THREADS

You could spend weeks on just the General Movie site looking over the new Men In Black test scene, or reviews on The Martian or rumors on Kingsmen, The Secret Service sequel is going to shoot. There’s better stuff though, for instance, in the Screenwriting Reddit Link, where almost 40,000 screenwriters can be found contributing on subjects like How to write screenplays using an Android device, what goes into a Series Bible or Nicholl Fellowship Award Winner interviews. The last one I’d recommend is to get educated, for free, by Max Landis. Thanks to my student Brian C. for turning me on to Max’s excellent Twitter feed. You know you’re doing something right when you’re following 63 people and 51,000+ are following you. I stumbled onto a Max Landis Reddit Thread which is also ridiculously valuable. Check it out here.

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  • RUDE AWAKENINGS & CINEMATIC TABLE FLIPS

I always remember Ebert talking about the cliche of every action sequence set on city streets, how inevitably some car would plow through a vegetable market. Many thanks to Roman Holiday for providing these excellent video montages of two other classic cliches, the waking up scene after a bad dream, and the Christ-like turning of tables anarchy scene. Next time you’re considering writing in one of these two scenes, remember these. For the Rude Awakenings video post:

“Fun fact: While searching for clips I discovered there was a joke in the 2008 Oscars ceremony where they mentioned that due to the writer’s strike they had to resort to using increasingly specific montages to pad the time out. One of these was entitled “Bad Dreams: An Oscar Salute”. It featured 7 movies. By comparison I was able to scrounge up 89 films.”

89! Check it out here.

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  •  THE MAKING OF UNCLE JOHN

I’m going to have to dedicate a full post to Indiewire, which is easily a Top 5 filmmaking website. They keep pumping out amazing –and free– articles like this one that give us specifics in how a successful project like Uncle John happens. Uncle John  was nominated for the 2015 SWSX Grand Jury Award and had a sold out run locally at the Midwest Independent Film Festival held at the Siskel Center. The trailer is here. Best of all is the article on how they pulled it off. Here’s a piece of it:

“…we tried very hard to keep from becoming precious about the whole project. Not that its easy — trying to get a micro-budget film together is all-encompassing because it requires your non-stop attention and a willingness to ask for endless favors. However, keeping that framed inside the fact that the rest of the world is also doing its own thing was incredibly helpful. Without proper money, way more no’s than “yes’s” came in. But, by keeping things reasonable and honest, the “yes’s” we got were for the right reasons.”

Good Reader, study the folks who make it happen, it might be all the film school you need. Thanks to Indiewire for bringing it to us.

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  • LINKS AND MORE LINKS

Many thanks to the Aspiring TV Writer and Screenwriter Blog for this quick screenwriting links list. Down and dirty, they spans the Wide World of Sports concerning the screenwriting biz. This site has a lot more to offer including tons of free stuff on Writing advice, Career Advice, Agents and Manager listings and plenty on industry job searches.  The blog is on my short list for industry news.

Another links site that I was previously unaware of is Screenwriting Spark. Hit this link and you’ll find about 50 links on OUTLINING. If you ever wondered how to get started on your screenplay, please check this page out. I’ll include just one link here, a YouTube video by UCLA Screenwriting professor Richard Walter.

  •  LEAVING LOS ANGELES

Long elephant years ago I had a fling with Los Angeles. Repped by William Morris, I took meetings, pitched for assignments, had an option deal, project close to packaged, ready to go. A grand illusion. not much actually ended up happening, except that years passed, and the big budget Indie never happened. In the end I split town without much pain. To be honest, I was never at home there. Little more than a tourist.

Scott Timberg is not a tourist. He wrote an amazing article he wrote for Los Angeles magazine about living in L.A., and the considerations of leaving. You should take it in, Good Reader, before you decide to head out there. The eternal debate of the necessity of living in L.A. and what that means on a daily basis is on display here in epic proportion.  Here’s a piece of it:

“Some have remained, but many have left for jobs or reasonable rents they can’t find in L.A. For those of us who’ve stayed to continue the struggle, life here feels distinctly temporary. There are layers of significance in going to California and especially in moving to Los Angeles. But what’s the meaning of leaving?
Los Angeles has been the site of fantasy, boosterism, and magical thinking for so long that it can be difficult to see the place clearly. People have come here from all directions: To the Japanese, this is the East. To Latin Americans, it’s El Norte. And to multitudes within the country—whether impoverished Okies or blacks fleeing the South or the beats or British rock musicians or artist Ed Ruscha in his old Ford on Route 66 or film people coming to break into Hollywood or small-town suburban folks looking to “make it” in the big city—the movement west has had a special resonance.”

Read the full article here.

Script Gods is Five!
Feb 2nd, 2015 by paul peditto

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Good Reader, WTF! Five years? Where’d that go? Looks like I missed the Anniversary. December 9, 2009 was the first post here at Script Gods. Here’s a piece of it:

“You’ve written a script (or 10) and sent it (them) out to varying degrees of success.  No breakthroughs, but there’s been “movement.” Or maybe you’ve had zero movement, and you’re pissed off.  Any of the following scenarios sound familiar?

  • You placed quarterfinals at the Southwest by Southeast Panhandle State Screenwriting Competition. They claimed industry pros would read your script but you haven’t heard back yet.
  • You sent out query letters and got a response from producer Rod Blagojevitch. His GotaGuy Prodco is located in Encino. You sent out the script with a $100 “reading fee” but haven’t heard back.
  • Your pitch for Stay Puff Marshmallow Man In Montana was well-received at Pitchfest. A junior agent at Gersch was interested enough to give you his card. You phone him, but the calls go unanswered. You follow up with emails, nothing. You don’t want to come across like a stalker so you wait for the agent to respond. It’s been three months…

Can I tell you: The agent did respond.

Hollywood rejection sounds like this:

…………………………………………………………………

Silent. Economical. Perfect.

You keep waiting for news, hoping something will break. What the hell else are you gonna do? And this is the $64,000 question: What can you do about it?

How about controlling what you can control?

How about being proactive?

How about not waiting for the phone to ring?

How about making something happen.

But how? You’ve read all the books and blogs; you took classes and seminars; you went to the cattle-calls at Pitchfest, even shelled out $300 for Screenwriting Expo 5…

Consider today’s thought from the sales department:

A customer will do what they do, until the pain of doing it becomes unbearable.

Or this thought, from The Sage:

Lessons are taught until they are learned.

There is an angle, something you haven’t thought about yet. There is a way.  When they told you at Pitchfest nobody is looking to buy your character-driven, deeply personal drama inspired from your very own Grampie and his days as a catfish noodler– what did you do? Did you crumble? Did you even finish the script? Welcome to Darwinism, Hollywood-style.

The Pitchfest finochio goes back to his gig at Smores, Buttcheek and Jones… and you? You toss in. You give up. Maybe it wasn’t meant to be. Writing is a pain in the ass. Not to mention the chances of your script turning into Slumdog Millionaire, Juno, Little Miss Sunshine are about as likely as you winning the Illinois Powerball Jackpot.

Object Lesson #1: If I can get my movie made, you can make yours.

That is my message to you, Good Reader.

You might be the genius in the crowd. You might not. Let’s find out. Read Script Gods Must Die. There will be learning here. Vamos!”

It’s been a good run.

Here’s what to look for in Year 6 at SGMD:

  • Original Posts: The majority of writing will continue to be original. I’m camping in all of Chicago February and will write about 30 blog posts in one shot. What’s the alternative–slip on an icy patch, break my leg and have the bone pierce the skin, yes THROUGH the skin, as just happened to a student of mine? Nah, I’m camping in. However…
  • Script Mag Sampler. Anyone who runs a blog or writes for one knows the monumental amount of time that goes into it. I’ve been writing for Script Magazine of late. Because I’m splitting time there and can’t freaking clone myself–I’m going to cull from the blogs of the 60+ writers my editor Jeanne Bowerman has assembled over there. We’ll link to some stuff I think might help you, with the screenwriting with attitude POV for SGMD.
  • Best Screenwriting Links & Articles: I’ve also accumulated a shitload of instructive online articles from last year. I’ll assemble an archive of them for you here.
  • Chat: It’s been awhile since I updated the status of the micro-budget film Boris Wexler and I finished in 2014. We’ve had some recent big news and I’ll spill it shortly.
  • Devolve: This web series I produced just wrapped (late January). Due date for release mid-April. Any of you thinking of making a web series, keep it tuned here.
  • Future Projects: As an ex-craps dealer, yeah, I might be more superstitious than most. So  I won’t jinx two very promising back-burner projects cooking right now–but when they move to the front burner, you’ll be the first to know.

So, stay tuned. This has been a no bullshit zone for five years, and will again…

Let me leave you with these 24 Life Lessons from Werner Herzog. Nothing more needs to be said.

Go and do likewise, Good Reader!

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Indie Screenwriting: What I Learned From Roger Corman….
Nov 15th, 2014 by paul peditto

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One of the best screenwriting teachers around is William C. Martell. You should check his site out. Quite some time he penned this article about writing for Indies on a budget. It’s an ode to Roger Corman and has some timeless lessons that can be applied to writing for digital D.I.Y. movies today.

Now, to show the love and care I have for you Good Reader, and all Script Gods readers, I am resurrecting this article, and presenting it here. It has nothing to do with the fact that it’s November in the year of our Lord 2014 and I am feeling a bit shut in today.

Therefore, without further ado…

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  • CORMAN: MR. INDIE

I think there are three good reasons why any look at writing Indie films needs to include the only film producer in the world who has never lost money on a single film… and made more films than most studios.

Let’s start with “Piranha”, or that “Star Wars” rip-off “Battle Beyond The Stars”, or the T&A gangster movie “Lady In Red”. All three were written by John Sayles, the king of Indie film makers. “Piranha” was his first produced script… Sayles learned from Corman how to write films that could be shot on a limited budget, and took that knowledge (and his script earnings) to the art house world with “Return Of The Secaucus Seven” in 1980. Sayles wasn’t the only one who started with Corman: Francis Ford Coppola, Patrick Shane Duncan, Martin Scorsese, Terence Malick, Carl Franklin, Jonathan Kaplan, and hundreds of others began their careers with the King of the Bs.

Second: Corman is an actual Indie producer. He’s not affiliated with any studios, he makes whatever he wants to make, his films are privately financed. He makes Indie genre movies…

  • IT’S THE BUDGET

But even if you do have a great Indie script and want to direct and produce your own film, there’s a lot that you can learn from Roger Corman. The first rule of Indie films: There’s never enough money and there’s never enough time. Studios can solve problems by throwing money at them, but Indies have to use ingenuity, imagination, and pre-planning. Indie films are made by design, and the set is the last place to discover that your script is too expensive to film on your budget. The key is to DESIGN a script that is both easy and inexpensive to shoot.

Time is money. Even on a credit card film where the cast and crew are friends you’ve talked into working for free, there’s a limit to how long they’ll donate their time. These people don’t want to spend their entire lives working on your dream, they have dreams of their own!

So here are over a dozen techniques for writing a film that can be made on an Indie’s limited budget. I learned all of these things the same way John Sayles did, from writing genre movies for low budget producers like Roger Corman.

-Piranha-[Roger-Corman's-Cult-Classics]

  • CONCEPT

Every new location means a crew move. The producer has to pay the crew to pack all of the equipment into the truck, drive to the new location, and unpack the truck. That is wasted money. So the fewer crew moves in your script the better.

Say you wanted to do a movie about a pair of Lesbians who share a drive cross country, begin hating each other, but end up falling in love: “When Harriet Met Sally”. That’s hard to do on a limited budget because it’s a “traveling story”, with lots of different locations and lots of characters at each location.

So, let’s change it to a more budget friendly concept: A pair of Lesbians become reluctant room mates, begin hating each other, but end up falling in love. “The All Gyrrl Odd Couple”. Easy to do on a limited budget. There is a central location where most of the story takes place (the apartment). The focus is on the two lead characters (which actually improves the story) and secondary characters either come to visit, or are people they encounter in the corner coffee/poetry shop. Because half of your script shoots at the central location, you can “walk away” at the end of the day – no time or money wasted on crew moves.

  • THE CENTRAL LOCATION

If you’re filming about half of your film at the central location, you need to find a place where drama and conflict can take place. “Reservoir Dogs” takes place in the warehouse a bunch of armed robbers are going to meet in to divide their loot. My “Steel Sharks” movie for HBO had two central locations: The sub control room where Gary Busey guided the submarine and the Aircraft Carrier control room where Billy Dee Williams ran the whole operation. We cut between these two locations and the half dozen others so that every couple minutes we were someplace new – no boring backgrounds. Take care to find a location where different types of people will bump into each other – that leads to conflict.

Read the rest of this entry »

Micro-Budget Screenwriting- Top 10 List
Oct 29th, 2014 by paul peditto

 

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“The ideal low-budget movie is set in the present, with few sets, lots of interiors, only a couple speaking actors (none of them known), no major optional effects, no horses to feed. It’s no wonder so many beginning movie-makers set a bunch of not-yet-in-the-Guild teenagers loose in an old house and have some guy in a hockey mask go around and skewer them.”

–John Sayles, Thinking in Pictures

Doing research for a book proposal, I came across these stats:

• Amazon search-keywords: Hollywood Screenwriting: Yields 20 pages, 754 books.
• Amazon search-keywords: Low Budget Filmmaking: Yields 41 pages, 549 books.

There are 754 books available today to help screenwriters in their quest to “make it” in Hollywood. Also, 549 “how-to-go-low-budget” books show the A-to-Z method of making movies for no money. But… what about the space between these?

• Amazon search-keywords: Micro-Budget Screenwriting: Yields 1 book.

Mega-audience for screenwriting books. Mega-audience for “how-to” low-budget filmmaking books. But where’s the book targeted specifically for screenwriters who want to write and make low-budget movies? A book for the 50,000+ screenwriters who registered scripts with the Writer’s Guild last year, who are desperate to find alternate strategies for making their films? Or who, through advances in digital camera technologies and software, no longer have to wait for Hollywood’s approval? Where’s the book for writers who are moving not toward Hollywood, but away from it?

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You’d think there would be more coverage here. There isn’t… for a reason. When you go online and search micro-budget screenwriting, soooooo much of the advice covers the same 5 or 10 bullet points. Hell, I’ve contributed a list like that myself.

How do we write a movie for the absolute lowest price possible without compromising the vision of the film?

Let’s expand out on some of those bullet-points with today’s Top 10 list… cue music, Paul…. how to write a micro-budget screenplay:

  • MICRO-BUDGET= WHAT YOU CAN PULL FROM YOUR POCKET

There’s no definition for what micro-budget is. Elusive. The thousand bucks I pull out of my pocket might equal the hundred thousand bucks an angel financier pulls from theirs. If I’m reaching for a definition, micro-budget is whatever funding you can pull from your pocket, or the pockets of your family, or the pockets of every friend you ever had when you mail the personal email begging for cash during your 30-day Kickstarter campaign. Micro-budget is money you directly control, without strings. The “unlimited-budget-write-your-dream-first-draft” has no place here. You raised, or can raise, $25,000–you sure as shit better write the movie with that figure in mind.

  • CONCEPT= GENRE + SIMPLICITY + VISION

Pre-dating Robert Rodriquez for the grand-daddy of Micro, for me, is Roger Corman. Look at his IMDB page: 408 Producer credits! Do you know of anyone who has more? His 56 Directing credits date back to 1955. And while Attack Of The Crab Monsters or Teenage Cave Man might not make AFI’s Top 100 movies of all-time, very few men can claim to have a “School” created from their aesthetic. Corman mentored and gave a start to many young film directors such as Ron Howard, Martin Scorsese and Peter Bogdanovich.[He helped launch the careers of actors Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson.

His low-budget B-movies made sure the stories reached the largest number of people by telling it in a recognizable genre. Certain genres always work for Micro– horror, comedy, thriller, drama. Corman went one-step further, adding campy comedy to his horror, or thriller aspects to a drama. These were “mash-ups” of genre done with simplicity and for a price. After you make a hundred of these you would not only know how to bring these in for a price, but for what appeals to a younger audience. Remember, Corman’s “Piranha” was called the “Best film ever made about the Viet Nam War” by Variety. ” The man had the ability to infuse genre pieces with a vision specific enough to father the “Corman School”, predating digital D.I.Y. by 40+ years.

On genres, it’s probably safe to say you should stay away from period-pieces or post-Apocalyptic action. Anyone who’s seen Primer knows Sci-Fi can be done cheap. Robert Rodriguez made El Mariachi for the infamous $7,000 bucks so Action is also on the list. Look at Fede Alvarez, who wrote and directed the remake of Evil Dead. How did a young filmmaker from Uruguay get that gig? He made a short film (Panic Attack!) that looked like it was made for a million dollars… for $300! Based on that short film he got noticed and representation in Hollywood. That is how you play the game! Show the Hollywood gatekeepers you can make a high-quality commercial product dirt cheap.

  • WRITE WHAT YOU HAVE= THE ROBERT RODRIGUEZ SCHOOL

Dude literally wrote the book on the subject. Predating the digital era, his advice of using what you have is more relevant today than ever. Locations, props, wardrobe– the goal is to pay for nothing. While unlikely you can get away with that goal for some expenses should try to never pay for a location. Take the resources you can bring and make an accounting. Dad owns a bowling alley? Set the movie in a bowling alley. Mom runs the local Salvation Army store? Guess the wardrobe and props will be coming from the Salvation Army. Friend owes you a favor who has a truck that can be shot or used for crew transport? Make the call! Beg, borrow, and steal. And this is only to start… time to flush the ego.

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  • CENTRAL LOCATION= FEWER COMPANY MOVES

For our micro-budget film Chat the director Boris Wexler managed to nail down the Board of Trade offices he worked at to be our cybersex chat offices. Amusing juxtaposition, thinking of what was happening in those conference rooms from Monday through Friday, and then what nastiness we were up to from Friday night until Monday 4 a.m. when we finally stopped shooting our marathon weekends. This location was worth at least $10,000 dollars (if we would have had to rent a similar space) and added tremendous production value. We shot here 10 of the 18 production and a pick up day.

You as writer need to understand the basics of film production. Sure, you can read twenty books on the subject, but wouldn’t it be better to get down on a film set or two? To understand that every new location you write= a crew move= $$$. The producer has to pay the crew to pack equipment into company trucks and vans, drive to the new location, and unpack. You want to limit the necessity of company moves.

Read the rest of this entry »

(OPM) Other People’s Money & The Need Therein
Oct 22nd, 2014 by paul peditto

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My good friend Colin Costello, a former Chicagoan who moved to Los Angeles, recently wrote an article about the how a writer needs to be in Los Angeles to be a professional. I asked Colin to define his terms—if, by professional, he means in the strictest sense someone getting paid to practice the art of screenwriting—then sure, L.A. is where the money and infrastructure is. The six TV shows shooting in Chicago right now employ reams of local actors and crew, but the production $$$ making this happen isn’t homegrown. It ain’t coming from Oz, either. These are L.A.-based production companies cashing in on Chicago’s great production resources, locations, and that soft money 30% tax incentive.

Sure, the established Writer’s Guild writer going the traditional route of agencies, pitching, and assignment work would have to be in Los Angeles. But if he thinks that the only way to make it, then I’m willing to debate him any day of the week.

You do not have to be in Los Angeles to make your movie.

hollywood_sign_kWhich might lead to the broader question of what “making it” even means.

I never used to write with budget in mind. I had stuff to say, I went about saying it. I knew I was a writer because I was going to write, with or without a payoff. Back in those days it was poetry and plays. The only thing complicated was attempting to pay the bills as a horse-and-carriage driver, a vibrating pillow salesman or even working the graveyard shift at the porno bookstore (Screenwriter Tip: If you take a gig at a porno bookstore to try to write your play in peace, don’t pick the graveyard shift. That’s the busiest shift by far. You’ll want to go morning shift. Write that down.)

Writing plays for non-equity Chicago theater companies, you don’t think about stupid shit like niche or budget or audience. You’ve got the paper-pirate Ar-tist hat on sideways and none of that other bullshit matters.

In a perfect world writers would write the scripts they need to write. Writing with that passion would result in a better script, maybe even a great script. This would garner a great placing at Inktip or Black List and attract the A-List producers who comb online websites for the next big thing. Or maybe it makes semifinals at Nicholl Fellowship and bags you a manager. The script would then be sent on to Jeremy Renner’s production company where you would sign a 6-figure deal, watch major talent attached and the movie make 50 million. You would then be part of the Writer’s Guild, take meetings, pitch and do assignment work.

In a perfect world…

filmspeed-74785-1You’ll tell me there are dozens of writers who have been signed off Black List and writers XY and Z who have gone on to make AB and C from such humble spec roots. It’s likely the craps dealer in me that wants to point out that for every writer you can name with a magical spec script story, I could certainly point to a thousand whose dreams did work out quite as well. That Bukowski line about the American Dream, and how the mythology tells us we can all be big-ass winners, while ignoring LOTS of folks in the gutter who never got a taste of the dream.

Great Peditto, so you’re saying stop dreaming? Don’t let rip? Don’t pour out your original and dazzling and passionate ideas?

Nope. I’m saying know thyself…and your project.

By ignoring budget and shooting for the stars you pretty much guarantee needing other people’s money. This guarantees the need of L.A. and the entire L.A. mechanism.

Sure, you might bag a producer off Black List who will option the script and ask you for budgetary changes. It happens.

It also doesn’t happen. Everybody writes the best story they can write. Everybody gives it their all. Everyone dreams of that glittering prize of a writing future you’ve got in mind.

If you’re doing assignment work for an Indie producer or Studio writing within their budget is mandatory. Chances are you won’t have reached this stage without full conception of what your words cost. If they’re budgeted at 5 million and you hand over a 50 million dollar rewrite, they won’t be able to use it, and won’t be happy with you, at all.

Writing the spec script is different. If you feel you need 100 million to tell the tale, go ahead and write it. Just understand that the list of folks who can actually make your flick just got narrowed by the necessity of find 100+ million.

Needing other people’s money, by definition, cedes power to them. It’s why you should consider writing with budget in mind.

From here on in, I will.

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